M.O.O.D. of America

The Measuring Optimism, Outlook and Direction (M.O.O.D.) of America Survey presents an insightful cross-sectional view of Americans' attitudes and behaviors toward retirement, health, personal life, wealth and finances.

2016: Gen Z Special Report

Gen Z (those born between 1995 and 2015) face a range of significant obstacles, and may have been influenced by watching their parents adapt to challenging economic times. This group will likely need to deal with college tuition bills, a highly competitive job market and, on average, live longer than earlier generations. Among other things, Lincoln’s M.O.O.D. of America survey shows this is an optimistic generation, one that is already starting to think about financial planning and the challenges.

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Sourced data
Video: Perspectives on the data
News release

 

2016: Financial Planning is a Non-Partisan Issue

Democrats and Republicans have something to agree on this election season—planning for their financial futures. According to the 2016 M.O.O.D. of America survey, members of both political parties are aligned when it comes to their views on retirement.

Infographics
Sourced data
Video: Perspectives on the data
News release

 

The “Right Track” to Financial Wellness: Five Key Factors

About half of the working population in the U.S. – 55 percent of individuals surveyed – feel they are on the “right track” to achieving financial well being, while the remaining 45 percent of feel they are not currently headed in the right direction.

This study looked into the lives of the “right-trackers,” and found five key factors – behaviors and influencers in these individuals’ lives – that contribute to their feelings of financial security and overall financial success. While some of these factors are clearly related to finances, others have nothing to do with money.

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LGBT Employees and Benefits: Impact of Marriage Equality

A year after the Supreme Court’s historic marriage equality ruling (Obergefell v. Hodges, June 2015), Lincoln Financial surveyed employed LGBT individuals to measure the impact of the ruling on employee benefits. The study found that while about 30 percent of LGBT individuals ARE proactively making changes to their workplace benefits as a result of the ruling, 50 percent are still unaware of its specific effects on their benefits.

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